Individual Support, Ageing and Disability - Draft 1

CHCPAL003_Deliver care services using a palliative approach_Consultation Draft 1

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Unit application and prerequisites

UNIT CODE

CHCPAL003

UNIT TITLE

Deliver care services using a palliative approach

APPLICATION

This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to provide care for people with life-limiting illness and those within the normal ageing process within a palliative approach as well as end-of-life care.

 

This unit applies to workers in a residential or community context. Work performed requires some discretion and judgement and is carried out under regular direct or indirect supervision.

 

The skills in this unit must be applied in accordance with Commonwealth and State/Territory legislation, Australian standards and industry codes of practice.

 

No occupational licensing, certification or specific legislative requirements apply to this unit at the time of publication.

PREREQUISITE UNIT

Nil

COMPETENCY FIELD

Nil

UNIT SECTOR

Nil

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Elements and performance criteria

ELEMENTS

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

Elements describe the essential outcomes

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

  1. Apply principals and aims of a palliative approach when supporting people.
    1. Recognise the holistic needs of the person extending over time, not just end-of-life.
    2. Support the person, carer and family to express needs and preferences and report information to supervisor.
    3. Communicate with the person, carer and family in relation to the person’s quality-of-life, pain and comfort and report information to supervisor.
    4. Respect the carer and family as an integral part of the care team and ensure that they have the information and support needed.
  1. Respect the person’s preferences for quality-of-life choices.
    1. Create a supportive environment that encourages the person, carer, family and others to share information regarding changing needs and preferences.
    2. Use a non-judgemental approach to ensure the person’s lifestyle, social, spiritual and cultural choices and needs are supported and documented in care plan.
    3. Encourage the person, carer, family and others to freely discuss spiritual and cultural issues in an open and safe environment within scope of own job role.
    4. Identify needs and issues outside the scope of own job role and refer to supervisor.
    5. Communicate with person, carer, families and others in a manner that shows empathy and provides emotional support.
  1. Follow the person’s advance care directives in the care plan.
    1. Interpret and follow advance care directives in the care plan in accordance with own job role and organisation, legal and ethical requirements.
    2. Comply with end-of-life decisions as documented in the care plan and in accordance with legal requirements.
    3. Report the person’s changing needs and issues in relation to end-of-life for documentation in the care plan according to organisational policies and procedures.
    4. Monitor the impact of the person’s end-of-life needs, issues and decisions on carer, families and others and refer to appropriate member of the care team for support according to organisational policies and procedures.
    5. Deliver services in a manner that supports the person’s right to choose the location of their end-of-life care.
  1. Respond to signs of pain and other symptoms.
    1. Observe and document the person’s pain and other symptoms in line with care plan directives and report to appropriate member of the care team.
    2. Implement strategies to manage pain and promote comfort in line with care plan and within scope of own job role.
    3. Document effectiveness of pain management strategies.
    4. Refer to supervisor any misconceptions in the workplace surrounding the use of pain-relieving medication.
  1. Follow end-of-life care strategies.
    1. Regularly check for any changes on care plan that indicate decisions made by the person have been reviewed.
    2. Provide a supportive environment to the person, carer, families and others involved in end-of-life care.
    3. Respect and support the person’s preferences and culture when providing end-of-life care according to care plan and within scope of own job role.
    4. Maintain dignity of the person when providing planned end-of-life care and care immediately following death.
    5. Recognise any signs of the person’s imminent death or deterioration and report to appropriate member of care team according to organisational policies and procedures.
    6. Provide emotional support to carer, families and others when a death has occurred within scope of own job role.
  1. Manage own emotional responses and ethical issues.
    1. Follow organisational policies and procedures to manage own emotional responses and ethical issues.
    2. Identify and reflect on own emotional responses to death and dying and raise and discuss any issues or reactions with supervisor or other appropriate person.
    3. Raise any ethical issues or concerns with supervisor or other appropriate person.
    4. Identify and action self-care strategies to address the potential impact of personal responses on self.
    5. Access bereavement care and support of other team members as needed.

2 Comments

Palliative Care, Inclusion and Intimacy

"At 2.2 it should be expanded to include “Use a non-judgemental approach to ensure the person’s sexuality, gender identity, lifestyle, social, spiritual and cultural, emotional and intimacy choices and needs are supported and documented in care plan. Sexuality and gender identity are not lifestyle choices and are not covered by social and spiritual needs. Additionally, people never consider the emotional and intimacy needs of people who are receiving palliative care. Connection and intimacy are intrinsic parts of a person and need to be supported regardless at what stage of palliative care they are at."

Samantha Edmonds 12.03.2021 12.59PM

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4.3

"I think the removal of the 001 wording 'Regularly evaluate and document' should remain. The importance of regular observtaions of pain/potential overdose of medications is very important, especially in the aged populatin with polypharmacy issues."

Steph Dickinson 12.03.2021 10.31AM

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Foundation skills

FOUNDATION SKILLS

Foundation skills essential to performance are explicit in the Performance Criteria of this unit of competency.

UNIT MAPPING INFORMATION

CHCPAL001 Deliver care services using a palliative approach.

LINKS

Companion Volume Implementation Guide

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Performance evidence

TITLE

Assessment Requirements for CHCPAL003 Deliver care services using a palliative approach.

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE

Evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit in the context of the job role, and:

  • supported, reported and documented issues and needs of three people in palliative care, including:
    • demonstrating support for the person’s needs and preferences in relation to their care
    • responding to changing needs and circumstances in the person’s care
    • providing emotional support to the person, carer and family as required
    • completing documentation in a timely, accurate and objective manner according to organisational policies and procedures
  • reflect on own emotional responses to death and dying and discuss with supervisor on at least one occasion.

1 Comments

Some important aspects can be highlighted.

"Some of the aspects that the students/new graduates need to know include pressure area care; being able to locate and navigate An advanced care directive; creating a pleasant/calm environment for the person; maintaining adequate hygiene while ensuring their comfort. This must be addressed somewhere in PEs. I believe the learners would appreciate learning actual skills to deliver such care. "

Vishnu Khanal 26.02.2021 11.01AM

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Knowledge evidence

KNOWLEDGE EVIDENCE

Demonstrated knowledge required to complete the tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit:

  • philosophy, principles, benefits and scope of palliative care
  • the needs of people dealing with a life-threatening or life-limiting illness and the emotional impact of diagnosis
  • cultural, religious and spiritual differences in relation to death and dying
  • the stages of grief and personal strategies for managing reactions to grief
  • advance care directives and end-of-life care strategies
  • pain relief and comfort promotion
  • nutritional and hydration requirements during a palliative approach
  • legal and ethical considerations for working in palliative care, including:
    • dignity of risk
    • duty of care
    • human rights
    • privacy, confidentiality and disclosure
    • work role boundaries, responsibilities and limitations
  • organisational policies and procedures for the provision of both a palliative approach and palliative care
  • responsibilities to self and colleagues
  • various signs of imminent death and deterioration
  • communication strategies to build trust, show empathy, demonstrate support and empower the person, carer, family and others.

3 Comments

Knowledge evidence - life-threatening

"Terminology: suggest removal of 'life-threatening' as this sounds acute and in need of acute, emergency intervention. Acute needs are very different to palliative end of life needs."

Steph Dickinson 12.03.2021 10.38AM

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How to support family after death of the client.

"Knowledge evidence could add some more on way to take care of the dead body. Looking at the cohort of the new staffs, it is always a challenge to see them sad, uncertain and scared in many occasions when they are asked to enter into a room where a client has just passed away. I believe we can prepare them at least emotionally while training in class. "

Vishnu Khanal 26.02.2021 11.04AM

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1 Reply

"'Take care of the dead body' believe that is up to the undertaker and we, the staff in the facility, afford due respect and dignity to the deceased and also support other residents, whilst maintaining confidentiality and privacy."

Cheryl Durston 02.03.2021 07.20PM

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Assessment conditions

ASSESSMENT CONDITIONS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Skills must be demonstrated in the workplace or a simulated environment that reflects workplace conditions.

 

Assessment must ensure access to:

  • facilities, equipment and resources that reflect real working conditions and model industry operating conditions and contingencies
  • organisational policies and procedures
  • palliative care plans
  • equipment and resources outlined in palliative care plans
  • opportunities for engagement with people in palliative care or people who participate in simulations and scenarios that involve provision of palliative care in a range of contexts.

Assessors must satisfy the Standards for Registered Training Organisations’ requirements for assessors.

LINKS               

Companion Volume Implementation Guide

1 Comments

Overall comment linking CHCPAL003 and 004

"There is a lot of repetition in performance criteria for CHCPAL003 and CHCPAL004. I would love to see these two units merged as they are so similar"

Steph Dickinson 12.03.2021 10.45AM

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