Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker - Draft 2

HLTAMED003 Administer medications_Draft 2

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Unit application and prerequisites

UNIT CODE

HLTAMED003

UNIT TITLE

Administer medications

APPLICATION

This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to administer medications to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander clients according to scope of medicines authority and clinical supervision arrangements established by the employing organisation.

 

It requires the ability to determine, check and confirm medication requirements, including calculating dosages, for individual clients. It covers clinical skills to administer medications and skills to instruct clients to self-administer their medications.

 

Medications can be prescribed, over the counter, traditional and bush medicines or complementary medicines.

 

This unit is specific to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people working as health care practitioners. It can, under certain circumstances also apply to health workers. They work as part of a multidisciplinary primary health care team to provide primary health care services to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander clients.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health workers and practitioners must be authorised, by various regulatory processes, to administer medications. The authority to administer medications is not always linked to an individual’s certification in this unit of competency. Current certification requirements should be checked with the local state or territory department of health and with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practice Board of Australia (ATSIHPBA).

PREREQUISITE UNIT

Nil

COMPETENCY FIELD

Medications

UNIT SECTOR

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health

ELEMENTS

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

Elements describe the essential outcomes

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

  1. Interpret and clarify orders and instructions for medication.
    1. Receive, interpret and clarify written and verbal orders and instructions for medications with medical practitioners or other senior health staff.
    2. Check written and verbal medication instructions against published medications information.
    3. Identify potential drug interactions and refer to authorised person.
    4. Recognise client allergies and adverse drug reactions, and contraindications for client use of medications and refer to authorised person.
  1. Prepare medication.
    1. Access medication according to organisational policies and procedures, regulatory requirements and within authority of own role.
    2. Use medication charts and published medications information to determine and confirm appropriate route or method for administration of medication.
    3. Correctly identify medication dosage in standing orders or care protocols or calculate mathematically.
    4. Measure required dose or volume of medication accurately using relevant equipment.
    5. Confirm with authorised person the calculated and measured medication dosage to be administered.
  1. Administer medications safely.
    1. Prepare a hygienic and sanitised environment for administration of medications.
    2. Use aseptic handling techniques and standard or universal infection control precautions according to medication requirements, organisational procedures and regulatory requirements.
    3. Identify client, obtain informed consent and administer medications using correct route or method according to medication instructions.
    4. Identify any adverse or allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, and take appropriate action in line with standard treatment protocols.
    5. Dispose of used equipment, packaging and medical waste according to product instructions and organisational policies and procedures for infection control.
  1. Instruct and monitor clients to self-administer medication.
    1. Prepare, or assist client to prepare, medication for self- administration and explain why it is important to take medication as prescribed.
    2. Demonstrate to client infection control precautions and correct use of relevant equipment for self-medication.
    3. Guide client through self-medication process and provide assistance as necessary.
    4. Confirm with the client completion of self-administration.
    5. Instruct and educate client to dispose of used equipment, packaging and medical waste according to product instructions and infection control guidelines.
  1. Complete documents for administration of medication.
    1. Update client records to include details of medication administered, access, dosage, and disposal information.
    2. Store all documentation securely according to organisation policies and procedures.

FOUNDATION SKILLS

Foundation skills essential to performance in this unit, but not explicit in the performance criteria are listed here, along with a brief context statement.

SKILLS

DESCRIPTION

Reading skills to:

  • interpret detailed and potentially complex organisational policies and procedures
  • interpret detailed and sometimes unfamiliar client records, medication instructions and potentially complex published medications information involving medication terminology and abbreviations.

Writing skills to:

  • use fundamental sentence structure, medication terminology and abbreviations to complete forms and reports that require factual information.

Oral communication skills to:

  • provide clear and unambiguous instructions to clients using plain language and terms easily understood
  • ask open and closed probe questions and actively listen to determine client understanding of instructions.

Numeracy skills to:

  • extract, interpret, calculate and record numerical information of varying complexity for different types of medications
  • use fractions, percentages, ratios and volumes
  • interpret, use and communicate temporal data, including minutes, hours, days and weeks.

Self-management skills to:

  • use critical thinking skills to evaluate implications and provide a considered response to adverse medication reactions.

Technology skills to:

  • use digital devices and software to accurately record administration of medication.

UNIT MAPPING INFORMATION

No equivalent unit.

For details, refer to the full mapping table in the Draft 2 Validation Guide.

LINKS

Companion Volume Implementation Guide

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Performance evidence

TITLE

Assessment Requirements for HLTAMED003 Administer medications

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE

Evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit in the context of the job role, and:

  • safely administer medication to a total of seven Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander clients to include:
    • babies
    • children
    • adults
    • the elderly
  • for each client check medication orders and instructions, identify issues to be referred to an authorised practitioner and, across the seven clients collectively, query:
    • contraindications for use of medications
    • potential drug interactions
    • adverse drug reactions
  • across the seven clients collectively, administer medication by each of the following routes or methods on three occasions: (51 administrations in total, noting that not all types of medications must to be administered to all types of clients)
    • oral
    • sublingual/buccal
    • eye drops
    • ear drops
    • nasal medications
    • dry powder inhaler
    • metered dose/spacer inhaler
    • nebuliser
    • oxygen therapy
    • topical medication
    • transdermal medication
    • vaginal medication
    • rectal medication
    • subcutaneous injection
    • intramuscular injection
    • intravenous injection
    • Z-track injection
  • instruct and monitor a further two clients to self-administer medication, each by different routes or methods
  • for each client interaction:
    • observe and apply The Rights of medication
    • document the administration of medication in client records
  • according to actual client interactions or case studies:
    • recognise two adverse effects from medications
    • provide response
    • accurately record details of the event in client records.

KNOWLEDGE EVIDENCE

Demonstrated knowledge required to complete the tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit:

  • local state or territory, and federal legal requirements, and associated organisational policies and procedures for:
    • access to medications by authorised personnel
    • obtaining informed consent
    • infection control
    • disposing of medical waste
  • legal responsibilities and boundaries of medicines authority applicable in the local state or territory for:
    • Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health practitioners in general, and how scope of practice impacts
    • own job role and scope of practice
    • other authorised primary health care team members
  • sources of information used to identify required details for medication administration:
    • standing orders and care protocols and types used by primary health care organisations including Standard Treatment Manuals (STM)
    • medicines books produced for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health practitioners
    • current authoritative medications publications used by health practitioners
      • how to access
      • purpose, format and inclusions
      • how to use to identify details about medications including what they are used for, how they work, contraindications, common side effects and adverse drug reactions, drug interactions, doses and routes of administration
  • documents used for client medication management, and their purpose, format, inclusions and secure storage requirements:
    • medication records
    • medication charts
  • how to use medication management documents and technology to:
    • identify client allergies and adverse drug reactions (ADR)
    • find instructions for client medications, including dose, route of administration, frequency and time
    • record medications taken or refused by clients
    • record adverse effects/events
  • main reasons for errors in the use of medications management documents, potential impacts and reporting requirements
  • common terms and abbreviations used for medications and dosages
  • The Rights (‘Rs’) of Medication, what each means and when each is used during the medications preparation and administration process
  • key aspects of medication groups and categories, and their general physiological effect on major body systems and associated organs, to include those for:
    • cardio-vascular system including heart, arteries and veins
    • respiratory system including lungs, nose, mouth and throat
    • senses including sight, hearing, smell, touch, taste and equilibrium
    • skin and integumentary system including skin layers, hair and nails
    • digestive and gastro-intestinal system including stomach, intestines and bowel
    • nervous system including brain and nerves
    • circulatory system including arteries and veins
    • genitourinary system including male and female genital and reproductive systems
    • endocrine system including glands and hormones
    • musculoskeletal system including skull, skeleton, muscles and body tissue
  • for a broad range of commonly used prescribed and over the counter medications:
    • indications
    • contraindications
    • potential drug interactions
    • purpose/therapeutic effects
    • consequences of incorrect use
    • consequences of administering via incorrect route
    • common side effects
    • potential adverse effects/events including common allergic reactions and anaphylactic reactions
    • storage requirements
    • handling requirements and disposal methods
  • differences between generic and trade names for medication
  • types of locally available traditional bush medications and their uses, benefits, side effects and interaction with other medications
  • complementary roles of traditional or bush healers
  • special considerations for use of medications, to include:
    • complicating factors of chronic illness, particularly those that relate to renal and liver impairment and the impacts on the efficacy of medications
    • ways of administering medications to babies, children, and the elderly
  • different types of infection control precautions and when these would be used for the administration of medications via different routes and methods:
    • universal
    • standard
    • sterile environment procedures
  • how to safely handle and dispose of sharps
  • presenting symptoms and signs that may impact on medication administration, including:
    • bruising, swelling, cuts and abrasions
    • appearance of eyes, ears, mouth and gums
    • blood pressure, respirations and temperature
    • emotional and mental state
  • techniques used to prepare and administer medications for adults and children using the following routes or methods:
    • oral medication, including use of dose administration aids (DAAs), counting tablets, dividing/cutting tablets, preparing syrups using graduated measure and/or syringes
    • sublingual/buccal, including usage of unopened and dated medication
    • eye and ear ointments and drops
    • nasal medications – sprays and ointments
    • dry powder, metered dose and spacer inhalers, including operation of accuhalers and aerolisers
    • nebulisers and oxygen therapy, including selection of appropriate equipment (oxygen cylinder or air pump)
    • topical and transdermal medications, including prevention of self-absorption
    • vaginal and rectal medication, including use of lubricant and client positioning
    • subcutaneous injections, including preparation of syringe and angle degree for insertion
    • intramuscular and Z-track injections, including correct injection sites for babies, children and adults, and preparation of syringe and angle degree for insertion
    • intravenous injections, including required equipment, inspection of cannula site, and follow up observation
  • for anaphylaxis:
    • signs of moderate and severe anaphylaxis
    • how to manage.

ASSESSMENT CONDITIONS

Skills must be demonstrated in a health service workplace within a multidisciplinary primary health care team, and under the supervision of an authorised member of the primary health care team.

 

Evidence of performance must be gathered:

  • during on-the-job assessments in the workplace under live conditions while interacting with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, or
  • during off-the-job assessments in the workplace, not under live conditions, using simulated activities while interacting with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.

 

Evidence of workplace performance can be gathered and reported through third party report processes. (Refer to the Companion Volume Implementation Guide for information on third party reporting.)

 

Evidence can be supplemented by assessments in a simulated workplace environment using simulated activities, scenarios or case studies only when:

  • the full range of situations covered by the unit cannot be provided in the individual’s workplace, and or
  • situations covered by the unit occur only rarely in the individual’s workplace.

 

Assessment must ensure the use of:

  • medications which are delivered by the following routes and methods, and equipment used to administer; mock medications can be used for any simulated activities:
    • oral
    • sublingual/buccal
    • eye drops
    • nasal medications
    • dry powder inhalers
    • metered dose/spacer inhalers
    • nebulisers
    • oxygen therapy
    • topical medication
    • transdermal medication
    • vaginal medication
    • rectal medication
    • subcutaneous injection
    • intramuscular injection
    • intravenous injection
    • Z-track injection
  • clinical waste and sharps disposal bins
  • client records:
    • medication records
    • medication charts
  • medications standing orders and care protocols used by the organisation, which can include Standard Treatment Manuals
  • current authoritative medications publications used by health practitioners
  • organisational policies and procedures for safely administering medications.

 

Assessors must satisfy the Standards for Registered Training Organisations requirements for assessors, and:

  • be an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has applied the skills and knowledge covered in this unit of competency through experience working as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health practitioner, or
  • be a registered health practitioner with experience relevant to this unit of competency and be accompanied by, or have assessments validated by, an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person.

LINKS

Companion Volume Implementation Guide

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