Individual Support, Ageing and Disability - Draft 2

CHC43121_Certificate IV in Disability Support_Draft 2.0

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Qualification description & entry requirements

QUALIFICATION CODE

CHC43121

QUALIFICATION TITLE

Certificate IV in Disability Support

QUALIFICATION DESCRIPTION

This qualification reflects the role of individuals in a range of community settings and peoples’ homes, who provide support in a manner that empowers people with disabilities to achieve greater levels of independence, self-reliance, community participation and wellbeing. Workers promote a person-centred approach, work without direct supervision and may be required to supervise and/or coordinate a small team.

 

To achieve this qualification, the candidate must have completed at least 60 hours of work as detailed in the Assessment Requirements of the units of competency.

 

No licensing, legislative, regulatory or certification requirements apply to this qualification at the time of publication.

ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

CHCSS001XX Disability Support Skill Set

OR

4,000 hours experience (equivalent to 2 years full-time work) in a registered disability service.

37 Comments

unrealistic RPL hours.

"based on the current typical working hours that a worker undertakes - 4000 hours is in many cases unachievable. While a worker could achieve that, it would be over time where skills may end up being out of date by the time that they achieved the total hours. 4,000 hours experience (equivalent to 2 years full-time work) in a registered disability service."

Rosalie Duke-Stanley 28.07.2021 04.02PM

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Prerequisites

"a. No. The entry requirements of 4000 hrs in a ‘registered organisation’ needs be modified to also recognise disability support where prospective students are ‘working for a self-funded participant in a private context” to bring the pre-requisites in line with NDIS frameworks. b. Additional pre-requisite of already holding a certificate lll qualification needs to be added to Cert 1V. Many regional disability workers who are yet to upskill with qualifications are career changers and hold previous cert lll or higher-level qualifications. Given they hold existing qualifications at the same level they do not meet DET eligibility requirements for Free TAFE and Disability Support is a low-income role – fees will be prohibitive for many. "

Julie Fry 26.07.2021 07.30PM

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Response to Draft

"Too little time has been allocated for proper feedback, especially where Vic and NSW in lockdowns. Never-the-less, here are some comments regarding assumptions being made that reduces the legitimacy of individualised support for how people might qualify for entry into this Cert IV course. Only institutional service is valid that only preparation in an institutional (organisational) setting is valid. That people working outside such arrangements are invalid and unqualified. Only organisational management of support is valid and effective. Only scrutiny and control (not values) is what makes for good and safe service. Consumer led practices are inherently uncontrolled and therefore unsafe. Only organisations and organisationally led workers are effective and safe. Any experience outside the direct gaze and control of organisations is invalid. Alternative assumptions: Only support arrangements that recipients have control over are more likely to be safe and effective. Staff who are responsible and responsive to recipients needs are more likely to delivery relevant and potent service. Immersion in community and in relationships is what protects people the most, not exclusion and "ownership" as "packages" to organisations. Consumer led supports are more likely to have features capable of demonstrating effectiveness: support locations relevant to people's roles: home, work, recreation; in grouping arrangements conducive to growth and status, effective use of time; contacts, interactions and relationships that convey status and belonging. The capacity for staff to identify with the people they support and who are not living in devalued circumstances, produce safety and respect, not the distance of hierarchy and policy."

John Armstrong 26.07.2021 12.42PM

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Contemporary language required

"'persons living with a disability' as a descriptor"

Lucy WHELAN 26.07.2021 08.41AM

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Supervision and allocation of care tasks

"Supervision and allocation of tasks relevant to individual support plans? "

Lucy WHELAN 26.07.2021 08.39AM

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Entry requitements

"Having the skill set as a pre requisite seems reasonable, but maybe use an RPL option instead of 4000 hours if people do not have these units."

Karen Voce 25.07.2021 10.18PM

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4,000 hours entry requirement

"2,000 hours may be more realistic/achievable plus Completion of the new Skill Set or current Cert III Individual Sup port (Disability)"

Karen Noble 23.07.2021 03.37PM

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2 Replies

"I agree with this Karen, for a sector that in generally made up of casual or part time workers 4000 hours it too many and will prove difficult to prove as these hours may go back over several years. "

Michelle Gleeson 27.07.2021 05.16PM

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"I agree with Karen - can the Certificate III in Individual Support (Disability) be included as an entry requirement. 4,000 hours in a casual work force will be a huge ask for many."

Sally Forbes 28.07.2021 01.36PM

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Entry requirements

"I believe you were on the right track prior - having their Cert III in Individual support was a great basis to build skills and entering a Cert IV. For me we want strong leaders and supervisors, this is about building capacity and having the Cert III prior to the Cert IV supports this. I also welcome the CHCLEG003 being in the core units. Having been a Service Delivery Manager for many years it is essential to have strong leadership and guidance for staff - understanding legislation and the "Why" we have policy or procedures is essential for good people skills and coordination. "

Samantha Smith 22.07.2021 10.50AM

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These entry requirements make no sense

"What is the basis for these entry requirements to the Cert IV? I came into my Cert IV at Holmesglen with no prior experience in disability and graduated as a support worker. I am now volunteering at a disability legal service while studying the Juris Doctor, and plan to use my knowledge gained from Holmesglen's Cert IV and experience gained from working in the disability sector to inform my communications and work in legal practice now and in the future. How would 4,000 hours' experience prior to entering the Cert IV have resulted in better outcomes for me as a student or the people I have since supported? How would me investing in a prior Disability qualification have qualified me to do better for people than I am currently doing? Why not just ensure the Cert IV equips new and existing workers in disability to do their jobs properly? As for the requirement that these hours be carried out in a registered disability service, my experience tells me this is a farcical requirement that should not stand the test of time. So many people with disability self-manage their NDIS plans for the express purpose of circumventing registered disability services. We have a sector problem that support workers and people with disability are specifically working overtime to get around. If this qualification wants to maintain integrity and relevance in the current climate, it will extend any experiential requirement to include personalised settings."

Katy Gagliardi 21.07.2021 10.30PM

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2 Replies

"I agree Katy. Most of the people with disabilities I support through their NDIS plans do not use a 'registered service'. They may for their first or second pan but then move to manage themselves. This than involves employing their own support workers. The other issue is that people do not have to be qualified to work in our sector. We need to ensure people get the relevant information (as I believe qualifications are very important) without making it onerous. As people will just work within the sector unqualified and I certainly do not want that. "

Charie Roberts 22.07.2021 07.56AM

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"I agree Katy, 4000 hours does not make sense and making students work in registered providers is not inline with the NDIS, I have a good portion of students who work as subcontractors or privately with people who self manage. We work wityh student on ways to provide better supervison across their placement and they are learning best practice in the classroom to be able to go back into their workplace better informed and change or challenge practices. This also occurs in the registered sector as well, where best practice is not necessarily implemented"

Sharyn Norie 26.07.2021 01.50PM

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NDIS principles of choice and control

"I too agree with all the comments by others. The 4000 hours is not only completely unworkable regarding evidence but runs contrary to the principles of the NDIS. The excessive skill set is also counter-productive and seems basically a de facto way of mandating the Cert III in Individual Support (Disability) as a prerequisite for the Cert IV in Disability Support, which in my view should stand alone as Lisa Harris said. What learner will have 4000 hours experience or choose the onerous skill set over gaining an actual qualification just to get into the Cert IV in Disability? The requirement for 4000 hours in a registered disability service privileges workers who already work for registered disability services. What guarantee is there that such workers meet the competencies as set out in the skill set? The requirement therefore privileges a service model designed for a market that existed 20 years ago, a market prior to the principles behind the NDIS becoming the tool to drive market revision from the inflexibility of the previous model that privileged disability services. As several people have commented, the Training Package needs privilege sole traders and independent workers because this model supports NDIS principles, especially "choice and control". People with disability and their families do not need more of the inflexibility inherent in the disability-services-privileged model but the flexibility that is offered through the independent worker model. "

Paul Sinclair 21.07.2021 01.51PM

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1 Reply

"I agree Paul"

Sharyn Norie 26.07.2021 01.51PM

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Entry requirement

"Many learners complete this qualification as a trainee. Having the 4,000 hours (which they would not have as an new entrant) or the pre-requisite is a huge disadvantage & cost. I think if we need to complete the skill set, maybe just 3 or 4 'getting started in disability' units would work better. "

Charie Roberts 21.07.2021 07.49AM

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Entry Requirements

"I agree with all comments that have been mentioned. It will be hard for an individual or RTO to prove they have worked 4000 hours. If they are an independent contractor through Mable or a Casual through Hire up, there are no contracts, or letters that can be provided. Also, payslips are not always provided by smaller organisations. This is going to lead to Third Party verifications that may not be true and accurate to gain entry to a qualification. Also note, verifying 4000 hours, does not mean they have the skills or knowledge needed to gain entry to the qualification. It could be 4000 hours of transporting clients to and from appointments, or domestic duties. I am not sure what this requirement is trying to achieve. I believe this to be quite a counterproductive measure. Having an individual study and achieve the Disability Skill Set to gain entry to this qualification. This means that students will be required to study 10 units of competency for a skill set, only to have to study a potential 8 more units. Also, if someone already holds the Certificate IV in Disability and just wants to upgrade, this has not been considered, due to the current entry requirements. This could have a huge impact on students transitioning from one qualification to another when it supersedes or looking to upgrade to the newer qualification. "

Andrew Mackenzie 19.07.2021 02.16PM

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2 Replies

"I agree with Andrew. Students need the valuable information the training package provides well before completing 4000 hours. "

Paul Kelman 21.07.2021 09.00AM

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"Notwithstanding all the above comments ... can I just comment that the Fair Work Act 2009 (Section 536) requires that all employers must provide a payslip within 24hrs of making a payment to an employee. There is no legal variation on this requirement. If a worker is a sub-contractor then they have the evidence of hours in their billing to the organisation. In an industry which is dominated by casual and CALD workers, it would be beneficial that they know their rights."

David Watt 26.07.2021 10.35AM

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Why isn't the Cert III Individual Support (Disability) added as a possible entry requirement option?

"The Cert III Individual Support (Disability) includes all the units in the skill set. Why would this not be considered an entry option? I also do not see the benefit of doing such a large skill set for entry into the Cert IV - when you could basically gain a Cert III qualification instead?"

Lisa Harris 16.07.2021 12.39PM

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6 Replies

"Hi Lisa, someone who had completed the Certificate III would have all of these units and be able to gain credit for that skill set and satisfy the entry requirement. The full Cert III was included in Draft 1, but this change was made on the basis of feedback that it was too onerous. "

Melinda Brown 16.07.2021 04.40PM

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"Thanks Melinda for your reply. (1) Could this just be listed as an additional entry requirement option, rather than going through the additional administrative process of crediting into the skill set? (2) I agree the full Cert III is too onerous, but this skill set is almost as onerous (without qualification status). My preference has always been for a stand alone Cert IV, even if that meant encompassing additional units."

Lisa Harris 16.07.2021 04.56PM

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"I agree, why create needless administrative work for people? And so, as I said earlier, the Cert III in Individual Support (Disability) is basically mandated de facto as the pre-requisite for the Cert IV in disability. "

Paul Sinclair 21.07.2021 01.55PM

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"Agreed"

Lucy WHELAN 26.07.2021 08.40AM

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"It is not compliant to provide a full credit transfer into either a qualification or a skill set - there must be at least one item which has been assessed - either RPL or trained/assessed. This certainly justifies the inclusion of the Cert III as an optional pathway. "

David Watt 26.07.2021 10.38AM

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"it is good to have two options to gain entry, so you could do the skill set and then apply, especially if you are looking at leadership"

Sharyn Norie 26.07.2021 01.52PM

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Entry Requirements

"The entry requirement of 4000 hours experience in a registered disability service does not consider workers who have gained expertise in individualised arrangements. “Choice and control” supposedly underpins the NDIS – so why penalise workers who are working directly with people with disability in gaining direct entry to the Certificate IV Qualification? Participants have 'choice and control' over “where, when and by whom the supports and services are provided,” - not having this reflected in the qualification does a disservice to workers and NDIS participants who may be eager for their workers to acquire this qualification. I also concur with Alexi Watt’s comment about the casualisation of the workforce, individuals working through multiple employers and the difficulty of gaining such evidence. On top of this – as mentioned, some workers will work through registered services and work directly with people with a disability through individualised arrangements. Again, why should the individualised arrangements not be included in this calculation? I would also be interested in the rationale behind 4000 hours of experience. "

Lisa Harris 16.07.2021 12.25PM

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2 Replies

"I agree Lisa. I know many families who due to the need for flexibility and control, employ the workers for their families and not go through a disability service. Maybe the 4,000 was a way to prove the learners have had 'hands on experience' - if so there has to be a better way (I notices the placement component has been decreased to 60 hours). "

Charie Roberts 21.07.2021 07.57AM

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"I agree with Lisa Harris and the comments that identify the limitations and complexity of the proposed entry requirements. Introducing entry requirements (as suggested above and in the previous draft) places the existence of the Certificate IV at risk. Emphasising instead a Certificate III qualification as or skill set (that is almost identical to the Cert III in IS (Disability) an acceptable entry level for disability support work. It is clear from the submissions to the Royal Commission into Violence, Abuse, Neglect and Exploitation of People with Disability that people with disability have too often received less than acceptable service, as a consequence of under qualified disability support workers and professionals who continue to promoted segregated options/services that benefit organisational needs. Suggesting that industry needs to listen to people with disability and their needs, recognising that ethically organisations are bound to provide quality individualised services delivered by qualified staff. The Certificate IV in Disability should not be placed secondary to attaining a skill set or having 4000 hrs of experience, rather the Certificate IV should be promoted as the minimum entry level for disability support work that promotes choice and control for those with disability. As mentioned by John Armstrong, Katy Gagliardi and Paul Sinclair above the training package and any entry requirements (if in fact needed) should reflect NDIS and values based principles. "

Tina Whitmore 26.07.2021 04.21PM

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entry requirements

"Many workers in the sector may struggle to consolidate evidence of 4,000hrs of relevant work given the casualised nature of the industry. RTOs verifying that evidence will need to speak with potentially multiple employers, not all of whom will be willing to provide that validation. What evidence underpins 4,000 as the number of hours chosen?"

Alexis Watt 15.07.2021 03.37PM

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entry requirements

"Why is the Cert III Individual Support (Disability) not listed as an option for meeting entry requirements for this Cert IV? As written, someone could do the listed skill set and have no other experience in the sector yet access this higher level qualification."

Alexis Watt 15.07.2021 03.35PM

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1 Reply

"Hi LAlexis, someone who had completed the Certificate III would have all of these units and be able to gain credit for that skill set and satisfy the entry requirement. The full Cert III was included in Draft 1, but this change was made on the basis of feedback that it was too onerous. "

Melinda Brown 16.07.2021 04.41PM

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Entry Requirements

"How are the learners to prove the 4,000 hours? Pay slips / letter from employer? "

Charie Roberts 15.07.2021 09.37AM

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4 Replies

"Hi Charie, those are good examples of how an RTO could verify the 4,000 hours work. "

Melinda Brown 15.07.2021 12.12PM

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"However, most people working in the industry on a casual basis don't keep payslips. A lot of companies don't even supply letters/contracts of employment, despite the fact this is a legal requirement. 4,000 hours is way too high to verify without a great deal of time and effort."

Julie Guest 17.07.2021 12.16PM

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"Hi Melinda, would volunteering count towards the number of hours decided upon? While I agree that there are significant logistical issues to be worked through by allowing volunteer work / individualised work as prerequisites (i.e. how would TAFE verify the work completed?), the risks far outweigh the benefits with the current proposal. Verification of hours, ensuring appropriate skillsets are obtained are inappropriate justifications for limiting prerequisites to 4,000 hours' proven experience / organisational experience. Another solution is not only preferable, but the only ethical and sector-relevant way forward (as I've detailed in another post)."

Katy Gagliardi 26.07.2021 04.32PM

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""Can including individualised experience as a prerequisite work? Yes/no" is the wrong question to ask. "Given that including individualised experience as a prerequisite is the only sensible way forward, how do we make it work?" is the question we need to find answers to."

Katy Gagliardi 26.07.2021 04.40PM

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Packaging rules

PACKAGING RULES

10 units must be completed:

 

  • 7 core units
  • 3 elective units, consisting of:
    • at least 2 units from the electives listed below
    • up to 1 unit from the electives listed below, or any other current endorsed Training Package or accredited course.

 

The units selected must be relevant to the work outcome.

3 Comments

Core Units- Suggest addition DISABILITY WORK IN A DIGITAL WORLD

"As Disability services move to more of an online platform for recording supports or services such as Riskman and as Governments also increasingly use online platforms for compliance and monitoring, a certain level of Digital knowledge is fundamental for staff working in Disability today. Additionally, clients are using various online platforms such as Facebook, What's Ap etc. Staff need to understand the importance of these resources as a part of providing quality and client centered supports. Another key learning must include information on the dangers of being online particularly as it relates to people with Intellectual Disability as vulnerable to exploitation and abuse. Staff should be able to detect this and guide and educate clients away from the dangers and towards sites that are safe and potentially can assist them towards greater inclusion. We need to have a conversation about this topic and be open to addressing the knowledge gaps in the current and proposed Cert IV in Disability Support. I'm happy to discuss this further. "

Olympia Tzanoudakis 28.07.2021 12.56PM

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Core Units

"Education about the rights and empowerment of clients should be a core unit. This knowledge and skill set is fundamental to the provision of supports and services to meet requirements as set out in the NDIS standards and all other rights frameworks. Its importance cannot be understated as it also may reduce the likelihood of poor service delivery or abuse/ neglect. We therefore agree that ‘CHCADV001 Facilitate the interests and rights of clients’ be added as a core unit."

Olympia Tzanoudakis 28.07.2021 12.08PM

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1 Reply

"I agree Olympia - CHCADV001 is a very good unit and be wonderful as a CORE."

Charie Roberts 28.07.2021 12.47PM

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Core units

CORE UNITS

 

CHCDIS012

Follow established person-centred behaviour supports

CHCDIS016

Develop and provide person-centred service responses

CHCDIS018

Facilitate community participation and social inclusion

CHCDIS019

Facilitate ongoing skills development using a person-centred approach

CHCDIS020

Provide person-centred services to people with disability with complex needs

CHCLEG003

Manage legal and ethical compliance

HLTWHS003

Maintain work health and safety

 

8 Comments

Entry requirement

"This requirement suits those who work in the sector without formal qualifications but will likely discourage new workers or those who would like to complete the Cert IV in Disability support and workers or employers who do not value a "Skill Set". Another way to do this is to rename the "Skill Set as the Cert III in Disability Support ."

Olympia Tzanoudakis 28.07.2021 11.49AM

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Food safety

"PCWs should all have a basic understanding of food safety principles. Suggest ‘HLTFSE001 Follow basic food safety practices’ is added to the core subjects."

Sayne Dalton 27.07.2021 01.19PM

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Human rights

"Basic education about the rights of clients should be a core unit. Suggest ‘CHCADV001 Facilitate the interests and rights of clients’ is a core unit or information about human rights and disability is taught as a separate core unit subject."

Sayne Dalton 27.07.2021 01.18PM

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1 Reply

"I agree with Sayne as understanding their rights and knowing how to speak up will not only improve satisfaction but also reduce the likelihood of exploitation and abuse.. This is a very serious matter."

Olympia Tzanoudakis 28.07.2021 11.05AM

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Core Unit

"Having the Core Unit "follow established person-centred behaviour supports" - will contribute further to negative assumptions about people with disability, and feed into the idea people are dangerous. This unit should not be a core unit. "

Lisa Harris 26.07.2021 05.53PM

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2 Replies

"I disagree Lisa - I teach this unit in a very relevant and respectful way of building relationships with people and we have a VR program that we drop students into to work on their de-escalation and communication skills. We have far too many workers injured as they do not know how to read a plan or understand what type of worker they are (fight, flight or freeze). This program is a pilot project that will be released to all tafes later in the year that has been very successful in the outcomes we were looking for. Students also need to know how to work in the psychosocial space as we are once again seeing people off the street sent in to work with people who have no background in understanding about mental health and disability"

Sharyn Norie 26.07.2021 06.36PM

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"Hi all. I think what you’re both saying makes sense, and that both perspectives can potentially be incorporated into the Cert IV. My understanding of Lisa’s comment is that it doesn’t matter how relevantly or respectfully the unit is taught: having ‘Follow established person-centred behaviour supports’ as a CORE unit tells students that ‘All people with disability have “behaviours of concern” that workers need to “manage” properly.’ This message is untrue – I have worked with people with few additional support needs (i.e. no “behaviour supports” needed), and with many additional support needs (i.e. “behaviour supports” needed). Therefore, having this unit as a CORE unit also undermines the essence of a Cert IV that works tirelessly to promote the dignity, individuality and positive assumptions about people with disability. However – my understanding of Sharyn’s comment is that this unit is essential for SOME workers in the disability sector. This is a valid point as well, as I know that the outcomes of insufficient implementation of person-centred behaviour supports (when these are needed, which is not always) can be disastrous. Therefore, might this unit be better placed as an elective so as to (a) not reinforce inaccurate / demeaning / stereotypical understandings of people with disability, while (b) giving students who need it the tools to work with people whose disability support needs mean they need behaviour support plans?"

Katy Gagliardi 26.07.2021 09.22PM

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Core Units

"I think the core units are appropriate (although I do think the CHCLEG003 is a difficult unit for most learners). My concern is that those who will need to complete the skill set (this will be most of the learners I teach) will then complete two WHS units and two legal and ethical units. I agree this information is imperative but what is the relational for this? "

Charie Roberts 21.07.2021 08.04AM

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ELECTIVE UNITS

 

CHCADV001

Facilitate the interests and rights of clients

CHCADV002

Provide advocacy and representation services

CHCAGE009

Provide services for older people

 

CHCAGE011

Provide support to people living with dementia

CHCAOD001

Work in an alcohol and other drugs context

CHCCCS001

Address the needs of people with chronic disease

CHCCCS004

Assess co-existing needs

CHCCCS005

Conduct individual assessments

CHCCCS006

Facilitate individual service planning and delivery

CHCCCS007

Develop and implement service programs

CHCCCS008

Develop strategies to address unmet needs

CHCCCS010

Maintain a high standard of service

CHCCCS017

Provide loss and grief support

CHCCCS018

Provide suicide bereavement support

CHCCCS019

Recognise and respond to crisis situations

CHCCCS022

Assist with movement

CHCCCS026

Transport individuals

CHCCCS033

Identify and report abuse

CHCCCS035

Support individuals with autism spectrum disorder

CHCCCS036

Support relationships with carer and family

CHCCCS037

Visit client residence

CHCCCS039

Coordinate and monitor home based support

CHCCCS042

Prepare meals

CHCCCS043

Support positive mealtime experiences

CHCCOM002

Use communication to build relationships

CHCDIS015

Develop and use strategies for communication with augmentative and alternative communication systems

CHCDIS017

Develop and promote positive person-centred behaviour supports

CHCDIS022

Prepare for NDIS support coordination

CHCDIS023

Coordinate NDIS participant support

CHCDIS024

Provide specialised support

CHCDIV002

Promote Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander cultural safety

CHCDIV003

Manage and promote diversity

CHCINM001

Meet statutory and organisation information requirements

CHCMGT001

Develop, implement and review quality framework

CHCMGT002

Manage partnership agreements with service providers

CHCMHS001

Work with people with mental health issues

CHCPAL003

Deliver care services using a palliative approach

CHCPAL004

Plan for and provide care services using a palliative approach

HLTAAP002

Confirm physical health status

HLTFSE001

Follow basic food safety practices

HLTHPS006

Assist clients with medication

HLTWHS004

Manage work health and safety

BSBLDR413

Lead effective workplace relationships

BSBLDR011

Demonstrate leadership in the workplace

BSBSTR402

Implement continuous improvement

 

QUALIFICATION MAPPING INFORMATION

No equivalent qualification.

LINKS

Companion Volume Implementation Guide

8 Comments

MHV additional psychosocial disability elective

"MHV recommends including the elective: Victorian Accredited Course unit elective: VU22859 Provide support to consumers with psychosocial disability"

Louise Alexander 22.07.2021 02.52PM

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1 Reply

"Excerpt from submission letter supporting the above recommendation: Ensure the workforce is skilled to meet the growing need for disability support for people with psychosocial and dual disabilities Due to significant anticipated growth in the delivery of disability supports to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities, this review constitutes a critical opportunity to ensure the Qualifications sufficiently prepare the disability workforce for this work. Up to 690,000 Australians could benefit from some form of psychosocial support. Despite this, the 290,000 or so people with the highest level of need currently lack the support or level of support they need. We also know that 32% of adults with disability (and 40% of participants with profound disabilities) experience high or very high levels of psychological distress, as opposed to 8% of adults without disability. In response to this need the Productivity Commission recommended that the States/Territories and the Commonwealth Governments work together to increase quantum funding for psychosocial supports. With negotiations for a National Agreement on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention underway, psychosocial supports outside the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) are likely to be a key focus. Within the NDIS the numbers of people with psychosocial disability and dual disability are also significant and growing. Statistics indicate that: • participants with a primary psychosocial disability are approaching 50,000, 10% of all participants, projected to increase to 64,000 (13.9%). • approximately 17% of all participants have a dual disability. Embed key principles to skill the workforce to provide disability support to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities The likely growth of psychosocial supports and the changing face of disability support with the inclusion of psychosocial disability in NDIS, requires that the Qualifications include skill sets relevant to supporting people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. Although some providers with experience delivering mental health services are NDIS providers, more frequently organisations and support workers with little or no skills and experience in this area provide NDIS supports to people with psychosocial and dual disability. NDIS providers report significant challenges attracting and maintaining staff willing and able to provide supports to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. NDIS support workers, many of whom hold one of the Qualifications up for review (if any), require additional skills and experience (and therefore confidence) to support people safely and adequately. We support the inclusion of skills to refer to specialists when mental health treatment is required. However, it is equally important that the day-to-day provision of disability support to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities is based on an understanding of the lived experiences of these groups, which differ from those of other disability types. This includes the unique personal, historical, structural, and cultural factors that can form barriers and enablers to inclusion, participation and recovery, which might include, for example: • experiences of social stigma, self-stigma, and discrimination (against people with mental illness or other intersecting issues, such as, addiction, low income, other forms of disability etc.). • the psychological impacts of trauma • the functional impacts of mental illness, especially episodic wellness • complexity arising from involvement with multiple services across sectors, including justice, health, housing, homelessness, alcohol and other drugs, and employment. The following principles support the development of these skills, which should underpin all interactions, decisions, and support of people with psychosocial and dual disability: 1. recovery oriented principles and practice 2. the social and emotional wellbeing framework 3. self-determination and choice 4. trauma-informed practice The centrality of these principles to disability support work is supported by the following key documents: • MHV’s Psychosocial Capability Framework 2020 • The NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Commission’s NDIS Workforce Capability Framework • The NDIA’s draft Recovery Oriented Practice Framework In our recommendations we have proposed an immediate solution to address the gap in the Qualifications’ skill sets to safely and adequately support people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. However, further consultation and work is needed to ensure these principles are more fully embedded into the Qualifications and other relevant training packages. In summary, the NDIS has significantly changed disability support work, which now includes the support of many people experiencing mental illness. Given the inclusion of psychosocial disability in the NDIS and the potential growth of disability support work, the Certificate III Individual Support and Certificate IV Disability are critical qualifications to grow an adequately skilled, entry-level care workforce to meet this need. To immediately address the gap in skills to support these groups, the Certificate III Individual Support and Certificate IV Disability should reference existing accredited electives (especially VU22859 and CHCMHS007). Furthermore, additional consultation and action should be undertaken to further embed those principles that are essential to working with people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. "

Louise Alexander 28.07.2021 01.37PM

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MHV additional trauma elective

"MHV recommends including the elective: CHCMHS007 Work effectively in trauma informed care (This is a core unit in Cert IV Mental Health and Cert IV Mental Health Peer Work.)"

Louise Alexander 22.07.2021 01.05PM

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2 Replies

"Louise, I agree we need a unit on trauma informed care and psychosocial support, there are definitely not enough electives or we need a core unit around these topics"

Sharyn Norie 26.07.2021 01.56PM

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"Excerpt from submission letter supporting the above recommendation: Ensure the workforce is skilled to meet the growing need for disability support for people with psychosocial and dual disabilities Due to significant anticipated growth in the delivery of disability supports to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities, this review constitutes a critical opportunity to ensure the Qualifications sufficiently prepare the disability workforce for this work. Up to 690,000 Australians could benefit from some form of psychosocial support. Despite this, the 290,000 or so people with the highest level of need currently lack the support or level of support they need. We also know that 32% of adults with disability (and 40% of participants with profound disabilities) experience high or very high levels of psychological distress, as opposed to 8% of adults without disability. In response to this need the Productivity Commission recommended that the States/Territories and the Commonwealth Governments work together to increase quantum funding for psychosocial supports. With negotiations for a National Agreement on Mental Health and Suicide Prevention underway, psychosocial supports outside the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) are likely to be a key focus. Within the NDIS the numbers of people with psychosocial disability and dual disability are also significant and growing. Statistics indicate that: • participants with a primary psychosocial disability are approaching 50,000, 10% of all participants, projected to increase to 64,000 (13.9%). • approximately 17% of all participants have a dual disability. Embed key principles to skill the workforce to provide disability support to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities The likely growth of psychosocial supports and the changing face of disability support with the inclusion of psychosocial disability in NDIS, requires that the Qualifications include skill sets relevant to supporting people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. Although some providers with experience delivering mental health services are NDIS providers, more frequently organisations and support workers with little or no skills and experience in this area provide NDIS supports to people with psychosocial and dual disability. NDIS providers report significant challenges attracting and maintaining staff willing and able to provide supports to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. NDIS support workers, many of whom hold one of the Qualifications up for review (if any), require additional skills and experience (and therefore confidence) to support people safely and adequately. We support the inclusion of skills to refer to specialists when mental health treatment is required. However, it is equally important that the day-to-day provision of disability support to people with psychosocial and dual disabilities is based on an understanding of the lived experiences of these groups, which differ from those of other disability types. This includes the unique personal, historical, structural, and cultural factors that can form barriers and enablers to inclusion, participation and recovery, which might include, for example: • experiences of social stigma, self-stigma, and discrimination (against people with mental illness or other intersecting issues, such as, addiction, low income, other forms of disability etc.). • the psychological impacts of trauma • the functional impacts of mental illness, especially episodic wellness • complexity arising from involvement with multiple services across sectors, including justice, health, housing, homelessness, alcohol and other drugs, and employment. The following principles support the development of these skills, which should underpin all interactions, decisions, and support of people with psychosocial and dual disability: 1. recovery oriented principles and practice 2. the social and emotional wellbeing framework 3. self-determination and choice 4. trauma-informed practice The centrality of these principles to disability support work is supported by the following key documents: • MHV’s Psychosocial Capability Framework 2020 • The NDIS Quality and Safeguarding Commission’s NDIS Workforce Capability Framework • The NDIA’s draft Recovery Oriented Practice Framework In our recommendations we have proposed an immediate solution to address the gap in the Qualifications’ skill sets to safely and adequately support people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. However, further consultation and work is needed to ensure these principles are more fully embedded into the Qualifications and other relevant training packages. In summary, the NDIS has significantly changed disability support work, which now includes the support of many people experiencing mental illness. Given the inclusion of psychosocial disability in the NDIS and the potential growth of disability support work, the Certificate III Individual Support and Certificate IV Disability are critical qualifications to grow an adequately skilled, entry-level care workforce to meet this need. To immediately address the gap in skills to support these groups, the Certificate III Individual Support and Certificate IV Disability should reference existing accredited electives (especially VU22859 and CHCMHS007). Furthermore, additional consultation and action should be undertaken to further embed those principles that are essential to working with people with psychosocial and dual disabilities. "

Louise Alexander 28.07.2021 01.38PM

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Limited knowledge

"The changes to the structure of the qualification will limit a students ability to be able to work across the different disciplines within this qualification. The qualification description states "This qualification reflects the role of individuals in a range of community settings and peoples’ homes, who provide support in a manner that empowers people with disabilities to achieve greater levels of independence, self-reliance, community participation and wellbeing. Workers promote a person-centred approach, work without direct supervision and may be required to supervise and/or coordinate a small team." Offering only 3 elective units will limit a students ability to acquire the full range of knowledge outlined in this description. "

Karyn Calcino 15.07.2021 06.15AM

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2 Replies

"I completely agree with Karyn."

Julie Guest 17.07.2021 12.28PM

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"I agree Karyn - 3 electives is very narrowing on what you can deliver"

Sharyn Norie 26.07.2021 01.57PM

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