Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Worker - Draft 2

HLTAHCS014 Provide ear health care_Draft 2

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Unit application and prerequisites

UNIT CODE

HLTAHCS014

UNIT TITLE

Provide ear health care

APPLICATION

This unit describes the performance outcomes, skills and knowledge required to complete ear health assessments, treat minor and emergency ear health issues and support clients with ongoing conditions. It also covers skills to provide resources and information about ear health to clients.

 

This unit is specific to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people working as health workers or health practitioners. They work as part of a multidisciplinary primary health care team to provide primary health care services to Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander clients.

 

No regulatory requirement for certification, occupational or business licensing is linked to this unit at the time of publication. For information about practitioner registration and accredited courses of study, contact the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practice Board of Australia (ATSIHPBA).

PREREQUISITE UNIT

Nil

COMPETENCY FIELD

Health Care and Support

UNIT SECTOR

Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Health

ELEMENTS

PERFORMANCE CRITERIA

Elements describe the essential outcomes

Performance criteria describe the performance needed to demonstrate achievement of the element.

  1. Complete ear health assessments.
    1. Use culturally safe and effective communication in all interactions to establish and maintain positive relationships.
    2. Obtain client health history or review available client information and health plans to establish individual ear care requirements.
    3. Use client questioning and observations to identify signs of possible hearing deficit.
    4. Complete routine ear examination according to scope of practice and standard treatment protocols used by the organisation.
    5. Follow procedures for infection control and correct and safe use of otoscope.
    6. Recognise abnormalities in ear canal and eardrum from otoscopy.
    7. Identify the need for prescription medication, further examination or full hearing test and refer clients to medical practitioners or specialist services according to organisational procedures.
    8. Accurately document details of client history and assessments in client records according to organisational policies and procedures.
  1. Treat minor ear health conditions.
    1. Provide clear explanations about minor ear treatments using terms the client will understand.
    2. Implement required infection control precautions according to treatment requirements.
    3. Recommend and demonstrate correct use of ear drops for clients with ear infections and symptomatic ear wax.
    4. Follow procedures for removal of ear wax according to scope of practice and standard treatment protocols used by the organisation.
    5. Follow first aid procedures and standard treatment protocols used by the organisation to address acute ear problems or injuries.
    6. Recognise situations requiring immediate emergency medical care and organise prompt assistance according to organisational policies and procedures.
    7. Update client records accurately and according to organisational procedures.
  1. Support clients with ongoing ear health conditions.
    1. Work within scope of practice and according to guidance provided by medical practitioner, audiometrist or audiologist, to provide continuity of care.
    2. Facilitate links and discussions between clients and ear specialists using culturally appropriate communication and information sharing.
    3. Identify and provide practical support that assists clients to access specialist ear health services.
    4. Update client records accurately and according to organisational procedures.
  1. Provide resources and information about ear health.
    1. Provide culturally appropriate education resources about ear health to clients and their families.
    2. Inform clients about ear health care resources and services available in the community and state or territory.
    3. Provide information about the importance of healthy lifestyle and protection and monitoring of own ear health.
    4. Explain to clients the nature of potential complications of diseases and their impacts on ear health and hearing.
    5. Explain basic aspects of common ear conditions and how they are treated and managed.
    6. Update client records accurately and according to organisational procedures.

FOUNDATION SKILLS

Foundation skills essential to performance in this unit, but not explicit in the performance criteria are listed here, along with a brief context statement.

SKILLS

DESCRIPTION

Reading skills to:

  • interpret familiar detailed organisational policies and procedures
  • interpret sometimes complex and unfamiliar standard treatment protocols involving medical terminology and abbreviations.

Writing skills to:

  • use fundamental sentence structure, health terminology and abbreviations to complete forms and reports that require factual information.

Oral communication skills to:

  • provide unambiguous information to clients using plain language and terms easily understood
  • ask open and closed probe questions and actively listen to elicit information from clients and to determine client understanding of information provided.

Numeracy skills to:

  • interpret and document medical numerical abbreviations and terminology in client records.

Technology skills to:

  • select and use appropriate equipment suited to purpose of ear health assessments.

UNIT MAPPING INFORMATION

No equivalent unit.

For details, refer to the full mapping table in the Draft 2 Validation Guide.

LINKS

Companion Volume Implementation Guide

2 Comments

Element 1: Complete ear health assessments

"I would suggest three assessments only: 1. What is the current status (including Client History); 2. Otosocopy; and 3. Tympanometry. 1. Use culturally safe and effective communication in all interactions to establish and maintain positive relationships. 2. Obtain the current status of the client’s ear, hearing and speech using questioning and observation, as well as any relevant history: 2.1 Document the current status of the client’s ears, hearing and speech. 2.2 Document family history, past surgery and previous hearing assessments. 2.3 Record and document results accurately in accordance with relevant policies and procedures. 3. Use client questioning and observations to identify signs of possible ear, hearing or speech deficit. 4. Complete an otoscopic examination according to scope of practice and standard treatment protocols used by the organisation. 4.1 Follow hygiene and infection control procedures. 4.2 Conduct otoscopy to produce valid, reliable and accurate results in accordance with relevant policies and procedures. 4.3 Identify and respond to any abnormalities of the outer ear 4.4 Identify any contraindications for proceeding with further ear and/or hearing assessments 4.5 Record and document results accurately in accordance with relevant policies and procedures. 4.6 Make referral to appropriate agency for further assessment if required. 5. Complete a tympanometry assessment according to scope of practice and standard treatment protocols used by the organisation. 5.1 Follow hygiene and infection control procedures. 5.2 Where age-appropriate, conduct tympanometry to produce valid, reliable and accurate results in accordance with relevant policies and procedures. 5.3 Accurately record and document results in accordance with relevant policies and procedures. 5.4 Make referral to appropriate agency for further assessment if required. 6. Identify the need for prescription medication, further examination or full ears and hearing assessment and refer clients to medical practitioners or specialist hearing services according to organisational procedures."

Simon McCormack 07.05.2021 03.36PM

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Ear Health Assessment

"Ear Health Assessments should include otoscopy PLUS tympanometry and audiometry at age appropriate times. An ear health assessment based on otoscopy alone is not comprehensive enough especially given the prevalence of OM and CHL in A&TSI children"

Jasmyn Adams 05.05.2021 01.46PM

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Performance evidence

TITLE

Assessment Requirements for HLTAHCS014 Provide ear health care

PERFORMANCE EVIDENCE

Evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit in the context of the job role, and:

  • complete an ear health assessment of a total of five Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander clients to include:
    • children
    • adults
  • for each of the five clients, and according to their individual needs, provide clear information and explanations about:
    • ear health conditions and treatments
    • self-care preventative practices that support good ear health
    • available ear health resources and support services
  • treat each of the following on two occasions:
    • infections to include drop administration
    • symptomatic ear wax (one requiring wax removal)
    • minor ear injury
  • document in client records, accurate details of each client contact:
    • health history
    • observations, examinations and tests completed
    • treatments, information and referrals provided
  • from assessments personally completed or from case study assessment documentation, identify signs of and report on two different ear conditions which require referral.

KNOWLEDGE EVIDENCE

Demonstrated knowledge required to complete the tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit:

  • organisational policies and procedures for:
    • maintaining ear health records
    • maintaining confidentiality of client information
  • for ear health:
    • legal and organisational responsibilities and role boundaries of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health care workers and practitioners
    • the roles of other members of the multidisciplinary care team including medical practitioners, audiometrists and audiologists
    • how to facilitate referrals
  • key information collected and recorded in medical histories specific to ear health
  • types of equipment used for ear examinations and treatments to include their key features and operating procedures
  • different types of infection control precautions and when these would be used for different types of ear examinations and treatments
  • overview anatomy and physiology of the outer and middle ear to include structure of the ear, how it functions and normal presentation
  • causes of hearing loss and their prevalence in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander adults and children:
    • congenital:
      • hereditary and non-hereditary genetic factors
      • complications during pregnancy and childbirth
    • acquired:
      • otitis media (particularly in children)
      • chronic ear infections
      • infectious diseases
      • injury to head or ear
      • excessive noise
      • recreational exposure to loud sounds
      • ageing
      • wax or foreign bodies blocking the ear canal
  • signs and symptoms of otitis media and other commonly occurring middle ear infections, and available treatment options
  • ear wax management:
    • normal and abnormal presentations
    • when cerumenolytic softening agents can be used and when ear wax removal may be needed
    • contraindications to ear wax removal
    • procedures for removing ear wax using curetting
  • complications and impacts of ear health conditions and hearing loss at individual and community level:
    • functional, including for learning and development in children
    • social and emotional
    • economic
  • first aid procedures and standard treatment protocols for treating minor ear trauma and presence of foreign bodies in the ear canal
  • ear health problems and emergencies requiring referral and treatment by medical or ear health specialists
  • self-care preventative practices for improved ear health in both children and adults:
    • avoidance of over-reliance on antibiotics
    • avoidance of smoking and smoke-filled environments
    • breastfeeding of infants
    • healthy eating
    • household hygiene
    • personal hygiene routines
    • regular ear health assessments
  • types of practical support needed by clients to access specialist services:
    • accommodation
    • interpreter services
    • transport
    • special assistance for those with hearing loss
  • ear health resources and support services available in the community, state or territory:
    • for ear health in general and for prevalent conditions in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, including otitis media
    • sound amplification services in educational settings
    • specialist services and government programs available to people of different genders or ages and to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
    • how to access information about the types of information resources and services they offer
    • how clients can access services and the role of health workers and practitioners in facilitating access.

ASSESSMENT CONDITIONS

Skills must be demonstrated in a health service workplace within a multidisciplinary primary health care team.

 

Evidence of performance must be gathered:

  • during on-the-job assessments in the workplace under live conditions while interacting with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, or
  • during off-the-job assessments in the workplace, not under live conditions, using simulated activities while interacting with Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people.

 

Evidence of workplace performance can be gathered and reported through third party report processes. (Refer to the Companion Volume Implementation Guide for information on third party reporting.)

 

Evidence can be supplemented by assessments in a simulated workplace environment using simulated activities, scenarios or case studies only when:

  • the full range of situations covered by the unit cannot be provided in the individual’s workplace, and or
  • situations covered by the unit occur only rarely in the individual’s workplace.

 

Assessment must ensure the use of:

  • personal protective equipment for infection control
  • equipment and consumables used for ear health assessments and simple treatments to include:
    • otoscope
    • specula
    • lighting aids
    • ear drops
    • clinical waste disposal bins
  • template forms or reports for documenting client histories, assessment details and findings
  • ear care first aid procedures and standard treatment protocols used by the organisation, which can include Standard Treatment Manuals
  • organisational policies and procedures for:
    • maintaining ear health records
    • maintaining confidentiality of client information.

 

Assessors must satisfy the Standards for Registered Training Organisations requirements for assessors, and:

  • be an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person who has applied the skills and knowledge covered in this unit of competency through experience working as an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health worker or practitioner, or
  • be a registered health practitioner with experience relevant to this unit of competency and be accompanied by, or have assessments validated by, an Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander person.

LINKS

Companion Volume Implementation Guide

4 Comments

Assessment conditions

"A couple of minor suggestions: Assessments must ensure the use of: • personal protective equipment for infection control  equipment and consumables used for ear health assessments and simple treatments to include: • otoscope (including tips) • tympanometer (including tips) • clinical waste disposal bin • ear model and resources to assist with the explanation of results  ear and hearing assessment form for documenting client histories, assessment details, findings and recommendations/referrals "

Simon McCormack 07.05.2021 04.57PM

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Knowledge evidence

"Demonstrated knowledge required to complete the tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit: • organisational policies and procedures for: • maintaining ear and hearing health records • maintaining confidentiality of client information • for ear and hearing health: • legal and organisational responsibilities and the scope of practice of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander health care workers and practitioners • the roles of other members of the multidisciplinary care team including medical practitioners, audiometrists, audiologists, speech pathologists and occupational therapists • how to facilitate referrals • key information collected and recorded in medical histories specific to ear and hearing health  a good understanding of equipment used for ear examinations (otoscopy) and middle ear assessments (tympanometry), including their key features, operating procedures and basic trouble-shooting.  different types of infection control precautions to be utilised when performing different ear and hearing assessments and treatments  an excellent understanding of the anatomy and physiology of auditory system and the ability to describe this clearly to clients  common causes of hearing loss and the prevalence in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander adults and children: • congenital: • hereditary and non-hereditary genetic factors • acquired: • other ear infections (otitis externa) • middle ear infections (otitis media) - particularly in children • injury to head or ear • excessive noise • recreational exposure to loud sounds • ageing • wax or foreign bodies blocking the ear canal  signs and symptoms of otitis media and treatment options  ear wax management: • normal and abnormal presentations • when cerumenolytic softening agents can be used and when referral for ear wax removal by a medical specialist may be required  impacts of hearing loss at individual and community level: o developmental o functional (including for learning and development in children) o social and emotional o economic  first aid procedures, standard treatment protocols and referral procedures for minor ear trauma and the presence of foreign bodies in the ear canal  ear pathologies and hearing patterns requiring referral and treatment by medical or ear health specialists  self-care preventative practices for improved ear health in both children and adults: o avoidance of over-reliance on antibiotics o avoidance of smoking and smoke-filled environments o breastfeeding of infants o healthy eating o household hygiene o personal hygiene routines o regular ear health assessments  types of practical support needed by clients to access specialist services: o accommodation o interpreter services o transport o special assistance for those with hearing loss  ear health resources and support services available in the community, state or territory: o for ear health in general and for prevalent conditions in Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander people, including otitis media o sound amplification services in educational settings o specialist services and government programs available to people of different genders or ages and to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people o how to access information about the types of information resources and services they offer o how clients can access services and the role of health workers and practitioners in facilitating access."

Simon McCormack 07.05.2021 04.48PM

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Performance evidence

"Evidence of the ability to complete tasks outlined in elements and performance criteria of this unit in the context of the job role, and: • complete an ear health assessment of a total of 10 Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander clients to include: • five children: • 2 x children aged between 6 months – 4 years; and • 3 x children aged between 5 - 18 years • five adults aged 18 years+ • complete an ear and hearing report for each of the clients, documenting clearly: • results of assessments undertaken • recommendations and/or referrals • treatments recommended • preventative practices that support good ear and hearing health • available ear health resources and support services • from assessments personally completed or from case study assessment documentation, identify signs of and report on two different ear conditions which require further referral. "

Simon McCormack 07.05.2021 04.14PM

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Assessment requirements

"In line with previous comments, competence and confidence in conducting and interpreting tympanometry and audiometry results and what the care pathway should be based off that"

Jasmyn Adams 05.05.2021 01.48PM

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